The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Rothberg International School

Division of Undergraduate Studies

Autumn Semester 2018-19

 

48369: Challenges of Regional Cooperation- A Comparative Perspective

 

Dr. Galia Press-Barnathan

 

Reading List

 

Classes: Monday and Wednesday 14:30-16:00

E-mail: galia.press-barnathan@mail.huji.ac.il / galiapress@gmail.com

Office Hours: By Appointment

 

Course Description

We often hear discussions and speculations regarding the chances of regional cooperation in the Middle East. Many of these discussions are inspired by the successful history of regional cooperation in Europe in the aftermath of WWII. Can we really learn anything from the European experience? Is the Middle East (or Europe?) unique? Are there any other examples of cooperation from other regions? The goal of this course is to explore and test the basic conceptual tools and competing theoretical arguments within the academic field of International Relations, which try to explain the nature, scope and degree of success of various regional cooperation schemes. While we may be more interested in the Middle East, it is crucial to understand our region within a broader comparative perspective. There, the course is divided into three sections: The first section outlines the key concepts and theoretical arguments. The second section explores, using these concepts, the nature and fortunes of regional cooperation in Europe, Asia, Latin American and Africa. The third section then zooms in to focus more specifically on the challenges and various examples of regional cooperation in the Middle East.

 

Learning Outcomes:

The students are expected by the end of the course to:

  1. Understand the main theoretical frameworks that explain variations in regional cooperation levels and success.
  2. Become familiar with the main regional cooperation frameworks around the globe- in Europe, Asia, South America, Africa and the Middle East.
  3. Critically compare these different frameworks, using the conceptual tools acquired.
  4. Apply the theoretical arguments to unfamiliar cases or future events.
  5. Write a serious research paper on one topic related to the class subjects.

 

Course Requirements:

  1. Attendance in all class meetings according to the regulations of the Rothberg International School.
  2. Class Participation. Students should be prepared to discuss the topics in the readings and actively participate in class. Attendance is not the same as participation. Students will also be expected to contribute to a weekly briefing on current world events related to the topics of the seminar. Students are expected to briefly present a selected article in one of the classes.
  3. Mid-term exam
  4. Writing a 20 page seminar paper on a topic to be decided with the instructor. The students will have to present their topic to class toward the end of the semester.

 

Grade breakdown

Class participation 20%

Mid-term exam       30%

Seminar paper         50%

 

Course outline and readings

 

The conceptual tool kit

1.      Regional cooperation in the Middle East? What is a “region”? What is “cooperation”?

2.      Our basic tool kit- International Relations theories and the study of the Middle East

3.      The impact of global and regional distribution of power on regional cooperation.

4.      The role of international institutions and interdependence in promoting regional cooperation.

5.       The impact of domestic politics and regime type on regional cooperation.

6.      The role of ideas, identity and the social construction of reality on the likelihood and nature of regional cooperation.

 

Between success and failure of regional cooperation projects-

7.      The classic case of successful regional cooperation: Western Europe-      

     From the CSCE to the EU

8.      The development and limitations of European security cooperation- From NATO to EDC to ESDP.

9.      The development of regional cooperation in Asia: ASEAN

10.  The upgrading of regional cooperation in Asia in the post-CW era: APT, ARF.

11.  MIDTERM [exact date TBA later]

12.  The rise of regional cooperation in Latin America: MERCOSUR

13.  The (failed?) attempt at regional cooperation in Africa: ECOWAS and the African Union (-already linked to the ME).

 

Regional cooperation in the Middle East

14.  The underlying challenges for regional cooperation in the Middle East in light of what we have learned so far.

15.  The Arab League- A failed regional cooperation institution?

16.  The Gulf Cooperation Council- shared values and common threats?

17.  Israel and regional economic cooperation- Peres’ “New Middle East”, bilateral cooperation with Egypt and Jordan.

18.  Third parties and promotion of cooperation in the ME I: The EU and the Barcelona Process. The US and the idea of MEFTA, regional QIZs.

19.  Student presentations

20.  Student presentations

21.  Student presentations

22.  Student presentations

23.  Student presentations

24.  Concluding session

 

Required readings

 

The conceptual tool kit

 

  1. Regional cooperation in the Middle East? What is a “region”? What is “cooperation”?

 

ü  David Lake, “Regional Security Complexes: A Systems Approach”, in: David Lake and Patrick Morgan (eds.,), Regional Orders: Building security in a New World (Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997), pp.45-67; Main Library JZ 1979 R39 1997; ERESERVE

 

ü  Louise Fawcett, “Regionalism in Historical Perspective”, in: Louise Fawcett and Andrew Hurrell (eds.,), Regionalism in World Politics: Regional Organization and International Order (Oxford University Press, 1995); p. 9-36. Main Library JN 94 A38 R43; ERESERVE

 

ü  Barry Buzan and Ole Weaver, Regions and Powers (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004.); E-BOOK; Overseas Library 327.116 B992

 

  1. Our basic tool kit- International Relations theories and the study of the Middle East

 

ü  Stephen Walt, “One world, many theories” Foreign Policy, No. 110, Special          Edition: Frontiers of Knowledge. (Spring, 1998), pp.29-32+34-46; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Fred Halliday, The Middle East in International Relations: Power, politics and ideology (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2005):

Introduction: “World politics, the Middle East and the complexities of area studies”, pp. 1-17. ERESERVE

OR Chapter 1: “International Relations theory and the Middle East”, pp. 21-40; Overseas Library ME327 H188; Main Library DS 63.18 H34 2005; ERESERVE

 

  1.  The impact of global and regional distribution of power on regional cooperation.

 

ü  Arthur Stein and Steven Lobell, “Geostructuralism and International Politics: The end of the Cold War and the regionalization of International Security”, in: Lake and Morgan (eds.), Regional Ordersbuilding security in a new world (University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997). pp. 101-122 [on the security dimension]; Main Library JZ 1979 R39 1997; ERESERVE

 

ü  Joseph Grieco, “Systemic Sources of Variation in Regional Institutionalization in Western Europe, East Asia and the Americas”, in: Edward Mansfield and Helen Milner (eds.), The Political Economy of Regionalism (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997), pp.164-187; Main Library HF 1418.7 P65; ERESERVE

 

ü  Galia Press-Barnathan, "The Changing Incentives for Security Regionalization: From 11/9 to 9/11", Cooperation and Conflict, Vol. 40, No. 3 (September 2005), pp. 281-304; E-JOURNAL

 

  1. The role of international institutions and interdependence in promoting regional cooperation.

 

ü  Robert Keohane, After Hegemony: cooperation and discord in the world political economy (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1984), ch. 6 pp. 85-109

[-this is the classic argument regarding the impact of international institutions on cooperation, a.k.a., the neoliberal institutionalist argument]; Overseas Library 337 K37; ERESERVE

 

ü  Andrew Moravcik, “Preferences and Power in the European Community: A Liberal Intergovernmental Approach”, Journal of Common Market Studies Vol.31, no. 4 (1993), pp. 473-524; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Jeppe Tranholm-Mikkelsen, “Neo-Functionalism: Obstinate or Obsolete? A Reappraisal in the light of the new dynamism of the EC”, Millennium, Vol. 20, No. 1 (1991), pp. 1-22 [a good review of the neo-functional argument regarding the expansion of cooperation]; E-JOURNAL

 

  1. The impact of domestic politics and regime type on regional cooperation.

 

ü  Etel Solingen, Regional orders at century's dawn: global and domestic influences on grand strategy (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1998), ch. 2-4, p.18-116; Overseas Library 327.1 S686; ERESERVE (ch. 2-3, pp. 18-89)

 

[additional suggested reading to be added]

 

  1. The role of ideas, identity and the social construction of reality on the likelihood and nature of regional cooperation.

 

ü  Emanuel Adler and Michael Barnett, “A framework for the study of Security              Communities” in Adler and Barnett (eds.,) Security Communities (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp.29-66; JOS on order, Main Library JZ 1305 S43; ERESERVE 001566422

 

ü  Michael Barnett, "Sovereignty, nationalism, and regional order in the Arab states   system", International Organization, Vol. 49, No. 3, (1995), pp.479-510;

E- JOURNAL

 

 

Between success and failure of regional cooperation projects-

 

  1. The classic case of successful regional cooperation: Western Europe-      

       From the CSCE to the EU

 

ü  The Marshall Plan: Michael Hogan, “The Marshall Plan” in Charles S. Maier (ed.,) The Cold War in Europe: Era of a Divided Continent (Princeton: Markus Wiener Pub., 1996), pp.203-240 [??Could a Marshall Plan work for the Middle East?]; Main Library D 843 C57732 1996; ERESERVE

 

ü  Andrew Moravcsik, "European Integration in Retrospect," in The Choice for Europe: Social Purpose and State Power from Messina to Maastricht (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1998), ch. 7, pp. 472-501 [summing up the findings of a very long and detailed book on the evolution of European integration]; Main Library JN 15 M56; ERESERVE

 

 

  1. The development and limitations of European security cooperation- From NATO to EDC to ESDP.

     

ü  Norrin Ripsman, "Two Stages of Transition from a Region of War to a Region of Peace: Realist Transition and Liberal endurance", International Studies Quarterly Vol.49 (2005), pp.669-693; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Galia Press-Barnathan, “Managing the Hegemon: NATO under Unipolarity”, Security Studies , Volume 15, No. 2 (July 2006), pp. 271-309; E-JOURNAL

 

Jolyon Howorth, Decision-Making in Security and Defence Policy: Towards supranational inter-governmentalism?, Berlin Working Paper on European Integration No. 17 (Berlin: Kolleg-Forschergruppe, Freie Universität Berlin, 2011). Free access:

http://userpage.fu-berlin.de/kfgeu/kfgwp/wpseries/WorkingPaperKFG_25.pdf

 

  1. The development of regional cooperation in Asia: ASEAN

 

ü  Yuen Foong Khong, “ASEAN and the Southeast Asian Security Complex” in: Lake and Morgan (eds.,) Regional Orders: Building security in a New World (Pennsylvania: Pennnsylvania State University Press, 1997), pp. 318-339; Main Library JZ 1979 R39 1997; ERESERVE

 

ü  Acharya, “Collective Identity and Conflict Management in Southeast Asia”, in Adler and Barnett (eds.,) Security Communities (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 198-227; JOS on order ; Main Library JZ 1305 S43; ERESERVE

 

  1. The upgrading of regional cooperation in Asia in the post-CW era: APT, ARF.

 

ü  Kent Calder and Francis Fukuyama (eds.,) East Asian Multilateralism: Prospects for Regional Stability (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008); Main Library HC 460.5 E276 2008:

ü  Kent Calder, “Critical Junctures and the contours of Northeast Asian                      Regionalism”, pp. 15-40; ERESERVE  

ü  G. John Ikenberry, “A New Order in East Asia?”, pp. 217-233; ERESERVE

 

         

  1.  The rise of regional cooperation in Latin America: MERCOSUR

 

ü  Arie M. Kacowicz, Zones of Peace in the Third World: South America and West Africa in Comparative Perspective (Albany: SUNY Press, 1998), Chapter 3 pp.67-124; Main Library JZ 5584 S63 K33; E-BOOK

 

ü  Andrew Hurrel, “Regionalism in the Americas” in Louise Fawcett and Andrew Hurrell (eds.), Regionalism in World Politics :regional organization and international order (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995), pp. 250-282; Main Library JN 94 A38 R43; ERESERVE

 

ü  Andrew Hurrell, “An emerging security community in South America?” in Adler and Barnett (eds.,) Security Communities (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 228-264; JOS on order ; Main Library JZ 1305 S43; ERESERVE

 

  1. The (failed?) attempt at regional cooperation in Africa: ECOWAS and the African Union (-already linked to the ME).

 

ü  Carol Lancaster, “The Lagos Three: Economic Regionalism in Sub-Saharan Africa”, in John Harbeson and Donald Rothchild (eds.,) Africa in World Politics (Boulder: Westview Press, 1992), pp.249-267; Main Library DT 30.5 A3544; ERESERVE

 

ü  Arie M. Kacowicz, Zones of Peace in the Third World: South America and West Africa in Comparative Perspective (Albany: SUNY Press, 1998), ch. 4, pp. 125-176; E-BOOK; Main Library JZ 5584 S63 K33

 

Bjørn Møller, The African Union as a Security Actor: African Solutions to                 African Problems? Working Paper series 2, 57 (London: London School of Economics and Political Science, Crisis States Research Centre, 2009). Free access: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/28485/ 

 

ü  Thomas Kwasitieku, “Explaining the clash and accommodation of interests of major actors in the creation of the African Union”, African Affairs Vol. 103, No. 411 (2004), pp. 249-267; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Jeffrey Herbst, “Crafting regional cooperation in Africa”, in Amitav Acharya and Alastair Johnston (eds.) Crafting Cooperation: Regional International Institution in Comparative Perspective, (Cambridge UP, 2007), pp. 129-144. Main Library HT 391 C73 2007; E-BOOK

 

  1. MIDTERM

 

 

Regional cooperation in the Middle East

 

  1. The underlying challenges for regional cooperation in the Middle East in light of what we have learned so far: power politics, the role of domestic politics (and more specifically the nature of state-society relations), the role of ideas (nationalism, pan-Arabism, Islam).

 

ü  Etel Solingen, "The Middle East," Regional orders at century's dawn: global and domestic influences on grand strategy (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1998), ch. 6, p. 165-215. Overseas Library 327.1 S686

 

ü  Avraham Sela, The Decline of the Arab-Israeli Conflict: Middle East Politics and the Quest for Regional Order ((SUNY Press, 1998), chs. 1-3, pp.1-54 [a thorough review of the nature of inter-Arab politics. Also relevant for next class on the Arab League]; E-BOOK; Overseas Library ME320.9 S464

 

  1. The Arab League- A failed regional cooperation institution?

 

ü  Michael Barnett and Etel Solingen, “Designed to fail or failure to design? The origins and legacy of the Arab League”, in Amitav Acharya and Alastair Johnston (eds.,), Crafting Cooperation: Regional International Institution in Comparative Perspective, (Cambridge UP, 2007); E-BOOK; Main Library HT 391 C73 2007

 

  1. The Gulf Cooperation Council- shared values and common threats?

 

ü  Abdul Khaleq Abdulla, “The Gulf Cooperation council: Nature, origins, and process” in Michael Hudson (ed.,) Middle East Dilemma: The Politics and Economics of Arab Integration (NY: Columbia University Press, 1999), pp.150-170; Overseas Library ME9 H886; Main Library DS 39 M53; ERESERVE

OR

ü  Michael Barnett and F. Gregory Gause III, “Caravans in opposite directions: society, state and the development of community I the Gulf Cooperation Council”, in Adler and Barnett (eds.,) Security Communities (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 161-193; JOS on order ; Main Library JZ 1305 S43

 

ü  David  Priess, “Balance-of-threat theory and the genesis of the gulf cooperation council: An interpretative case-study”,  Security Studies, Vol. 5, No. 4 (June 1996), pp. 143-171; E-JOURNAL.

 

ü  Gregory Gause, “Balancing what? Threat perception and Alliance choice in the Gulf," Security Studies, Vol. 13, No. 2 (January 2003), pp. 273-305; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  John Sandwick (ed.,) The Gulf Cooperation Council: moderation and stability in an interdependent world (Boulder: Westview, 1987); Overseas Library ME338.91 S221; Main Library DS 201 M353 G85

 

ü  Emile Nakhleh, The Gulf Cooperation Council: policies, problems and prospects (New York: Paraeger, 1986); Overseas Library ME338.91 N163; Main Library DS 201 M353 N35

 

Israel and regional economic cooperation- Peres’ “New Middle East”, bilateral cooperation with Egypt and Jordan.

 

ü  Shimon Peres, The New Middle East (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1993);        Overseas Library ME327.172 P437 

 

ü  Dalia Dassa Kaye, Beyond the Handshake: Multilateral Cooperation in the Arab-Israeli Peace Process 1991-1996 (NY: Columbia University Press, 2001), introduction, pp. xi-xxii; ch. 3, pp. 44-75; ch. 5, pp. 110-157; Overseas Library E327.172 K23; Main Library DS 119.76 K38 2001

 

ü  Galia Press-Barnathan, The political economy of transitions to peace (Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 2009), ch. 2-3, pp. 33-81; Overseas Library 327.172 P935; Main Library JZ 5538 P76 2009; E-BOOK

 

  1. Third parties and promotion of cooperation in the ME I: The EU and the Barcelona Process.

 

ü  Rory Miller and Ashraf Mishrif, “The Barcelona Process and Euro-Arab Economic Relations 1995-2005,” MERIA, Vol.  9, No. 2 (June 2005); E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Fulvio Attina, “The Barcelona process, the role of the European Union and the lesson of the Western Mediterraneaný", The Journal of North African studies, Vol. 9, No. 2 (2004), pp. 140-152; E-JOURNAL

 

  1.  Third parties and promotion of regional cooperation in the ME II: The US and the idea of MEFTA, regional QIZs.

 

ü  Robert Lawrence, A US-Middle East trade agreement: a circle of opportunity? (Washington, DC: Peterson Institute for International Economics, 2006). E-BOOK

 

ü  Völker Perthes, "America's 'Greater Middle East' And Europe: Key Issues For Dialogue", Middle East Policy, Vol. 11, No. 3 (Fall 2004), pp. 85-97; E-JOURNAL

 

ü  Pete W. Moore, “QIZs, FTAs, USAID and the MEFTA: a political economy of acronyms”, Middle East Report, No. 234 (Spring 2005), pp. 18-23; E-JOURNAL

 

  1. A regional international society in the Middle East? English School meets the ME

 

ü  Barry Buzan and Ana Gonzalez-Pelaez (eds.,) International Society and the Middle East: English School Theory at the Regional Level (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2009), chs. 1, 9 and 10, pp. 1-23, 201-250; Overseas Library ME9 B992; Main Library JZ 1318 I58 2009

 

 

HAVE A PRODUCTIVE AND INTERESTING SEMESTER!!!!